Grid

Figure/Ground Study, black gesso on paper, 48" x 46"

Still Life

Still Life, 2011, First painting, Florence, Italy, oil on canvas, 32" x 24"

Paint

Midnight Lattice, 2012, oil on canvas, 32" x 24"

Optical Mix

Optical Mix, 2012, close proximity of colors allows the eye to mix two colors to perceive one dominant color; colored paper on bristol, 4.5" x 7.5"

Blue Shift

Value Shift, 2012 The chip color appears to shift in value because of its corresponding parent colors, colored paper on bristol,, 6" x 4.5"

yellow

Value shift, colored paper on bristol, 6" x 4.5"

red

Shift in Value, colored paper on bristol vellum, 6" x 4.5"

value

Chip (center) color shifts value across the color border, colored paper on bristol, 6" x 4"

shift2

The two chips (center) appear to have the same color when a viewer concentrates on the color border, colored paper on bristol, 6" x 4.5"

trans

Transparency Study, inset colored paper on bristol vellum, 6" x 11"

trans2

Transparency overlay showing gradual depth recession, inset colored paper on bristol vellum, 5" x 7.5"

trans3

Transparency overlay showing gradual depth recession, inset colored paper on bristol vellum, 5" x 7.5"

mood

Comic Relief mood study (same palette as Intoxicated and Mood #3), inset colored paper, 6" x 4"

mood

Intoxicated mood study demonstrating the effect of inebriety through color (same palette as Comic Relief and Mood #3), inset colored paper, 6" x 4"

mood2

Mood study showing equal distribution of colors as no single color overwhelms the composition (same palette as Intoxicated, Comic Relief), inset colored paper, 6" x 4"

This gallery contains recent works with a focus on figurative representation as distinguished from color form relationships. These paintings and paper works attempt to define a color space that understands color as form. Several of the paper works are based upon exercises found in Josef Albers' Interaction of Color and are examples of shifts in value and hue. Depending upon which parent color (background) a chip (smaller color) rest on, the human eye will perceive that chip's value or hue differently. While the transparency studies attempt to demonstrate illusion through the use of color, the mood studies describe feeling as a byproduct of optical experience. While drawings may represent recognizable forms, these particular color studies enter a separate realm of visual theory: one that does not rely on recognizable objects, but rather, a space that relishes in color.